States’ COVID-19 Manufacturing Guidelines

LAST UPDATED: Thursday May 21, 2:00PM ET
 
As more states issue and revise emergency orders to stop the spread of COVID-19, NMMA is working to help our manufacturers nationwide assess and understand the implications of these orders.
 
The following resource is intended as a snapshot to help navigate this rapidly-changing environment. Please consult with regulators within the appropriate jurisdiction and your own stakeholders including legal counsel before making a determination on how to best proceed with your company’s operations.
 
As states have announced intentions to find ways to lift stay at home orders and open up businesses, we have included some regional information:
·      Northeastern states (PA-DE-NJ-NY-CT-RI-MA) announced their intention to work as a group on lifting stay at home orders and reopening commerce. Find a copy of their press release about those efforts here.
·      New England states (ME-NH-VT) announced their creation of a multi-state task force to reopening their economies.
·      Midwestern states (MN-WI-IL-IN-MI-OH-KY) announced their intention to coordinate their efforts to reopen the economy. Read more here.
·      Western states (CA-OR-WA-CO-NV) announced their intention to work as a group on lifting stay at home orders and reopening commerce. CA Gov. Newsom outlined factors that will shape those states’ thinking, read more here.
Most state legislatures will be reconvening in the days and weeks to come. Please find a complete list of what date your state’s legislature reconvenes here.
 
FEDERAL CISA GUIDANCE:
The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) updated its list of “Critical Essential Infrastructure” on Saturday, March 28 to expand upon its guidance for states and municipalities as to what business operations should be considered “essential.”
The March 28th update definition of “Critical Manufacturing” reads as follows:
·      Workers necessary for the manufacturing of metals (including steel and aluminum), industrial minerals, semiconductors, materials and products needed for medical supply chains, and for supply chains associated with transportation, energy, communications, information technology, food and agriculture, chemical manufacturing, nuclear facilities, wood products, commodities used as fuel for power generation facilities, the operation of dams, water and wastewater treatment, processing and reprocessing of solid waste, emergency services, and the defense industrial base. Additionally, workers needed to maintain the continuity of these manufacturing functions and associated supply chains, and workers necessary to maintain a manufacturing operation in warm standby.
·      Workers necessary for the manufacturing of materials and products needed to manufacture medical equipment and personal protective equipment (PPE).
·      Workers necessary for mining and production of critical minerals, materials and associated essential supply chains, and workers engaged in the manufacture and maintenance of equipment and other infrastructure necessary for mining production and distribution.
·      Workers who produce or manufacture parts or equipment that supports continued operations for any essential services and increase in remote workforce (including computing and communication devices, semiconductors, and equipment such as security tools for Security Operations Centers (SOCs) or datacenters).
Alabama
Executive Orders:  Alabama is operating on a “safer at home” posture allowing a partial reopening of nonessential retail businesses beginning on May 11 and extending through May 22. During this period, businesses that had previously been closed can reopen under specific guidelines. Employers are required to practice mitigation policies including social distancing and hand-washing; face coverings are only required for businesses where staff come into close contact with customers. Read more here.

The Alabama Small Business Commission Emergency Task Force recently put forth a plan for re-opening the state economy. For manufacturing and industry, the Task Force recommends that each organization develop an internal pandemic response team that will implement a “return-to-work” plan. It is recommended that the plan include the following:
·      An inbound parts/materials/packages disinfection strategy
·      A transportation contamination mitigation strategy
·      An on-site health screening strategy
·      A social distancing strategy based on the layout and workflow of the facility
·      An isolation strategy for a potential COVID-19-infected employee or contaminated facility
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturers can be open as the “Stay at Home” order has expired, but businesses are subject to sanitation and social distancing guidelines.
 
Contact: Lee Gatts (lgatts@nmma.org)
 
Alaska
Executive Orders: Governor Mike Dunleavy on April 24 announced his “Reopen Alaska Responsibly” plan and Health Mandate 16. Activities and businesses that were governed by previous health mandates may resume under the conditions and guidance provided by the mandate. Intrastate travel is generally unrestricted. The order pre-empts any local restrictions and requires reopening businesses to practice social distancing, sanitization and other operational limitations in this early phase of the statewide reopening plan.  Phase 2 went into effect May 8, retail and other operations may resume at 50% capacity. Read more here
Phase 3/4 will go into effect on May 22, read more here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing is open under the Reopen Alaska Responsibly plan, which allowed for reopening on April 24. For non-public facing businesses – see required protocol’s here.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Arizona
Executive Orders: More retail businesses will be allowed to open under certain conditions starting at noon, May 16 under Executive Order 20-36.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing is designated as essential. Related to the previous order, on March 23, Governor Ducey signed an executive order prohibiting the closure of essential business by local governments. The order pre-empts local or municipal orders closing manufacturers:
 
Manufacturing companies, distributors and supply chain companies producing and supplying essential products and services in and for industries such as pharmaceutical, technology, biotechnology, healthcare, chemicals and sanitization, waste pickup and disposal, agriculture, food and beverage, transportations, energy, steel and steel products, petroleum and fuel, mining, construction, national defense, communications as well as products used by other Essential Businesses and Operations.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Arkansas
Executive Orders: Governor Asa Hutchinson created the Economic Recovery Task Force comprised of 26 government and private sector leaders. Three smaller subcommittees will meet more frequently. Arkansas Department of Parks, Heritage, and Tourism Secretary Stacy Hurst will lead the committee on tourism, community and healthcare; Arkansas Secretary of Commerce Mike Preston will lead the committee on commerce; and Arkansas Secretary of Agriculture Wes Ward will lead the committee on agriculture, grocery and education. Read more here.
 
Retailers are allowed to reopen as long as they limit person-to-person contact and maintain appropriate social distancing of at least six feet to prevent the spread of the virus, full retail guidelines can be found here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing is open.  All businesses, manufacturers and construction companies must implement the following protocols for diminishing the threat of COVID-19:
·       Limit the number of people who can enter into the facility at any one time to ensure that people in the facility can easily maintain a minimum six-foot distance from one another.
·       At places where lines form at a facility (inside or outside), facilities should mark off six foot increments at a minimum, establishing where individuals should stand to maintain a physical distance of six feet.
·       Employees entering a facility should wear a face covering to diminish potential spread if they are asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic for COVID-19, especially when maintaining a physical distance of six feet is not possible.
·       Customers or members of the public entering a facility should be strongly encouraged to wear a face covering to reduce the potential for introducing COVID-19 into the facility.
·       Employees should be screened for fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat or loss of taste or smell as they are entering the building at the beginning work.
·       Provide hand sanitizer, soap and water or effective disinfectant at or near the entrance of the facility and in other appropriate areas for use by the public and employees and in locations where there is frequent employee interaction with members of the public.
·       Retail businesses are encouraged to provide contactless payment systems or provide for the disinfection of all payment portals, pens and styluses after each use.
·       Regularly disinfect any high-touch surfaces.
·       Signs must be posted at all entrances advising the public not to enter if they have fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat or loss of taste or smell and if they have had known exposure to someone with COVID-19 in the past 14 days.
·       Signs must be posted at all building entrances advising the public that they may wish to refrain from entering if they are 65 years of age or older or have underlying health conditions including high blood pressure, chronic lung disease, diabetes, severe obesity, asthma or weakened immunity.
·       Employees who are diagnosed with COVID-19 must be reported to the Arkansas Department of Health. Businesses should assist ADH staff in conducting contact tracing in their facilities, in order to prevent an outbreak from occurring.
·       Consider maintaining a log with dates and time of persons entering a facility to facilitate contact tracing in the event an outbreak occurs.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
California
Executive Orders:  Governor Newsom has reopened office workspaces where teleworking is not possible, outdoor museums and limited personal services -- such as car washes, dog-grooming and landscaping -- with protections to limit the spread of COVID-19. Statewide guidance for these sectors is available here and here. Governor Newsom instituted Stage Two of his six stage re-opening plan, which allows for limited reopening of retail and manufacturing facilities.  The following list of Stage 2 sectors, businesses, establishments or activities qualify to reopen upon certification that the county meets CDPH criteria and implement the relevant Industry Guidelines: Retail Sector; Manufacturing Sector; Logistics Sector; Destination retail, including shopping malls and swap meets; Personal services, limited to: car washes, pet grooming, tanning facilities, and landscape gardening; Office-based businesses (telework remains strongly encouraged); Dine-in restaurants (other amenities, like bars or gaming areas, are not permitted); Outdoor museums and open gallery spaces. Read more here.
 
The governor created the Task Force on Business and Jobs Recovery to help reopen the economy. He will begin creating subcommittees for a number of sectors soon, a full list of members can be found here. Recommendations for reopening will be based on the Governor's six criteria, read more here.
 
County Orders Impacting Executive Orders: Many counties met the criteria to open more businesses.  A map designating those counties can be found here. However, The Public Health Officers of the counties of Marin, Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and the City of Berkeley issued revised shelter-in-place orders that largely extend the current restrictions through May 31. The new order limits easing of specific restrictions to a small number of lower-risk activities. On March 31, the seven counties issued new, more restrictive stay in place orders that requires all individuals to stay in their homes and prohibits travel except for work at essential businesses. The orders mirror one another in imposing more limited definitions of “essential” businesses in a way that could impact manufacturers. The order — see Section 13(f) in Marin County’s order provides a narrower definition of construction, limiting it principally to only COVID-19 responses, and in 13(f)(xx) has language that could severely impact manufacturers: “Businesses that have the primary function of shipping or delivering groceries, food, or other goods directly to residences or businesses. This exemption shall not be used to allow for manufacturing or assembly of non-essential products or for other functions besides those necessary to the delivery operation.”
 
This order would appear to go a step further than the statewide standard set by Gov. Newsom’s March 19 executive order that functionally adopts a “shelter in place” ruling for much of the state of California. The order exempts from the order manufacturers identified as contributing to “critical infrastructure” within the federal guidance referenced above.
 
Given that the order essentially adopts this federal guidance, manufacturers may refer to the DHS critical infrastructure list in interpreting the California order.  Questions should be referred to this address: LegislativeAffairs@CalOES.ca.gov  
 
Marine Manufacturing: Marinas, boat ramp, boating-related retail stores and sporting goods stores are open. Governor Newsom’s office has released guidelines for reopening manufacturing. The state entered Phase Two of the governor's Resilience Roadmap on May 6. More information can be read here. The California Business Roundtable has released a detailed report with its recommendations for restarting the California economy.Bookstores, sporting goods stores, and florists likely will be able to reopen under new state guidelines to be announced Friday, May 8. Associated manufacturers that support those retail supply chains will also be able to resume production.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Colorado
Executive Orders: On April 26, Governor Jared Polis issued a new executive order lifting some restrictions on businesses in the state as part of the "back to work" plan outlined last week. The order, in Section H(6), allows critical businesses to continue operations with social distancing and mitigation policies. The order asks the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment to issue additional guidance to prohibit gatherings of 10 or more people (even in private establishments), and advise Coloradans to wear masks outside the home. Read more here.
 
The new order allows non-critical retail businesses to offer curbside or delivery services beginning May 1, and for non-critical businesses to resume up to 50% of their in-person activities beginning May 4, as long as they follow mandatory social distancing requirements. The order stays in effect through May 26.
 
Additionally, the previous Stay-At-Home order issued by the city of Denver expired May 8.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing is open. As of May 4, non-critical businesses may to resume up to 50% of their in-person activities beginning May 4, as long as they follow mandatory social distancing requirements.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Connecticut

Executive Orders: Governor Ned Lamont enacted executive order 7PP which repeals several previously enacted executive orders to allow for the safe reopening of certain sectors of the economy on May 20, including for the reopening of outdoor dining, offices, retail and malls, museums and zoos, and outdoor recreation businesses, allowing Connecticut to enter Phase 1 of its reopen plan. Retail sector guidelines for reopening can be found here. Outdoor recreation businesses are defined to include boat tours (subject to 5 passengers), charter fishing (subject to 5 passengers), kayaking and sport fishing, the full list can be found here. The target date for entering into Phase 2 is June 20.

Connecticut has established a Reopen Connecticut Advisory Group but it is not open to the public. Read more here.

 
On April 18th, Governor Lamont, along with Governor Cuomo (NY) and Murphy (NJ) announced that marinas, boatyards and marine manufacturers in their states will be allowed to open for personal use as long as strict social distancing and sanitization protocols are followed.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Marine manufacturers are allowed to open as long as strict social distancing and sanitization protocols are followed.
 
Gov. Lamont signed an executive order 7BB, requiring individuals to wear face coverings in public, including places of work, when unable to maintain a safe social distance.
 
Additional guidance in 7V for Safe Workplaces in Essential Businesses. Every workplace in the State of Connecticut shall take additional protective measures to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19 between and among employees, customers, and other persons such as delivery drivers, maintenance people or others who may enter the workplace. The Commissioner of Economic and Community Development, in consultation with the Commissioner of Public Health, shall issue legally binding statewide rules prescribing such additional protective measures no later than 5:00 p.m. on April 7, 2020. Such rules shall be mandatory throughout the state, for essential businesses and nonprofits and any other business or nonprofit permitted to operate, and shall supersede and preempt any current or future municipal order. Nothing in such rules or this order shall supersede Executive Order No. 7S, Section 1, or the “Safe Stores” rules promulgated thereunder. The full list of safe workplace rules can be found here.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Delaware
Executive Orders: Governor John Carey issued a stay-at-home order that closes non-essential businesses and is in effect through May 31 or until the “public health threat is eliminated”. Read more here. The Governor expanded on his stay at home order, read morehere. Delaware’s Prosperity Partnership has been surveying businesses for their needs when reopening the economy. The latest survey results can be found here. Prosperity Partnership and the Division of Small Business are partnering with the General Assembly and local Chambers of Commerce to plan reopening the economy. Governor Carey announced June 1st as the target for Phase One to begin being implemented. Retail will be allowed to reopen at 30% capacity on June 1st, for retail guidance click here. To read the phased processes or to submit considerations, clickhere.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Essential businesses may remain open. Ship and boat as well as engine, turbine and power transmission equipment manufacturing are considered essential (page 2). A full list of essential businesses can be found here.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Florida
Executive Orders: Governor Ron DeSantis’ Economic Task Force has issued its report and the Governor has put into effect the first phase of his “Re-Open Florida” plan for all counties . The first phase will allow retailers to open at 25% capacity. The full phase one plan can be read here. The Governor’s Office also created a “Re-Open Florida” online comment portal. Please comment here. Any member of the public can submit comments through this web portal system. . Orange County’sEconomic Recovery Task Force will next meet May 21 to continue towrite guidelines for theme parks in its jurisdiction, which included Disney World. Although no report has been issued, hereis an outline of possible rules.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing is an “essential” activity exempt that remains openasdefined in the federal CISA guidance (Section 2A) as well as those identified in an earlier, partial-state stay at home order which adopted Miami-Dade County’s own order (07-20), which mostly focused on closing non-essential retail businesses, but established in Section 2(ee) that “Factories, manufacturing facilities, bottling plants, or other industrial uses” were permitted as essential. No subsequent order appears to do anything to affect that essential designation. The new executive order extends until April 30, and a clarifying order emphasizes that the statewide order supersedes any conflicting local order. For updated list of individual city, county and other orders, click here.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Georgia
Executive Orders: Previously, Governor Brian Kemp issued an executive order ordering Georgians to stay in place, with exemptions for “essential” businesses as defined by the federal CISA guidance, along with “suppliers which provide essential goods and services to the critical infrastructure workforce.” The order was in effect through 11:59PM on April 30, but has since been lifted. Governor Kemp has extended the public state of emergency through June 12. Additionally, Governor Kemp will require medically fragile and elderly Georgians to continue to shelter in place through June 12. Read more here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturers are open as the shelter in place order has been lifted, however in accordance with executive orders, businesses must operate with strict social distancing and sanitation rules to keep customers and employees safe through May 13, 2020. Those rules vary by business type for a measured, health-driven approach. Read more about implementing guidelines from the previous executive order here.
 
Contact: Lee Gatts (lgatts@nmma.org)
 
Hawaii
Executive Orders: On April 26, Gov. Ige extended Hawaii’s stay at home order until May 31. The first week of May, Gov Ige announced Phase 1 of the state reopening to begin on May 7 at 12:01AM. Phase 1 is to include repair shops, but there are further restrictions in Maui county and Honolulu. Read more here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Gov. Ige will allow the reopening of several nonessential retail businesses beginning May 7. The state’s stay at home order remains in place through May 31, with exemptions for essential manufacturers identified under CISA. The order includes additional exemptions for manufacturers:
Manufacture, distribution, and supply chain for critical products and industries. Manufacturing companies, distributors, and supply chain companies producing and supplying essential products and services in and for industries such as pharmaceutical, technology, biotechnology, healthcare, chemicals and sanitization, waste pickup and disposal, agriculture, food and beverage, transportation, energy, steel and steel products, petroleum and fuel, mining, construction, national defense, communications, as well as products used by essential businesses and operations.
 
Businesses that remain in operation must practice social distancing, maintain separate operating hours for high-risk populations and make “readily available” hand sanitizers and sanitizing products.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Idaho
Executive Orders: Governor Little’s “Idaho Rebounds” plan moves into stage one of four on May 1. Retail operations will be able to reopen from May 1 - May 16, provided they follow the plan’s protocols, found here.  These protocols include social distancing, sanitation requirements, limiting close interactions and identifying strategies for addressing ill employees. The Governor’s staff will evaluate moving into phase two and beyond every two weeks. Read the full plan here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Essential business designations are defined by federal CISA guidelines. There are no additional mentions of manufacturing made in the order, though there have been additions made to the list of essential businesses as identified in section 3(f), a full list can be found here.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Illinois
Executive Orders: Governor Pritzker issued at stay-at-home order which began Sunday March 22 and is in effect through May 30, which is an extension from the previous date of April 30. Additionally, the extension order, introduced new restrictions on manufacturers, including requirements to provide face coverings to employees who cannot practice social distancing, and limiting operations to "essential" lines of production. Read more here. Language regarding manufacturing includes:
 
ESSENTIAL BUSINESSES AND MANUFACTURING: Essential businesses and manufacturers will be required to provide face-coverings to all employees who are not able to maintain six-feet of social distancing, as well as follow new requirements that maximize social distancing and prioritize the well-being of employees and customers. This will include occupancy limits for essential businesses and precautions such as staggering shifts and operating only essential lines for manufacturers.
 
Early May, Governor Pritzker announced the “Restore Illinois Plan” outlining five phases to reopen the state. As of May 05, Governor Pritzker indicated Illinois is currently in Phase 2 statewide, with a goal of moving toward Phase 3 – which allows for the reopening of “non-essential” manufacturing businesses – possibly on a regional basis beginning May 29. Read more here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: The order defines a number of essential infrastructure items and essential businesses — including manufacturing companies and their supply chains. (See section 12(t).) A footnote additionally clarifies that “the definition of Essential Business and Operations is meant to encompass the workers identified” in the DHS-CISA order.
 
Specifically, the following manufacturing facilities, distribution, and supply chains are considered essential and may continue to operate. Employees are considered essential and may continue working in your facilities.
 
Manufacturing companies, distributors, and supply chain companies producing and supplying essential products and services in and for industries such as pharmaceutical, technology, biotechnology, healthcare, chemicals and sanitization, waste pickup and disposal, agriculture, food and beverage, transportation, energy, steel and steel products, petroleum and fuel, mining, construction, national defense, communications, as well as products used by other Essential Businesses and Operations.
 
The Illinois Manufacturers Association, offered this analysis: Manufacturers will self-determine if they fall under this guideline. It will not require a special designation or permit from the State of Illinois.
 
On April 13, Illinois Workers’ Compensation Commission (IWCC) issued a proposed emergency rule allowing employees of essential businesses who are diagnosed with COVID-19 to apply for workers’ compensation benefits. The rule would pose challenges for employers to prove that infected individuals contracted the illness outside of the workplace. Read more here.
 
Contact: Jill Sims (jsims@nmma.org)
 
Indiana
Executive Orders: Governor Eric Holcomb previously issued a stay at home order which has expired. On Friday May 1, Governor Holcomb announced “Back on Track ” which is guidance that lays out re-opening the economy in a phased approach for the state. Marinas and boat repair were included in essential infrastructure in the original executive order and manufacturing has now been opened. Read more here.
 
Marine Manufacturing:  Manufacturing is allowed under “Phase 2: Back on Track - Guidance for Indiana”, which went into effect Monday May 4.  This phase allows for manufacturing facilities that were previously closed under the stay at home order to resume work.
 
In the order, Section 29 reads: Manufacture, Distribution, and Supply Chain for Products and Industries Companies
Manufacturing companies, distributors, and supply chain companies producing and supplying products and services in and for industries may open and operate subject to requirements in section 4.
 
Section 4 outlines requirements for businesses and entities in Indiana; which are detailed below:
4. Requirements for All Businesses and Entities in Indiana
Businesses continuing operations or being allowed to reopen must adhere to the following:
a.     Safeguards:On or before May 11, 2020, all Hoosier employers shall develop a plan to implement measure and institute safeguards to ensure a safe environment for their employees, customers, clients and members. The plan shall be provided to each employee or staff and posted publicly. The plan shall address, at minimum, the following points:
i.       Institution an employee health screening process;
ii.     Employing enhanced cleaning and disinfecting protocols for the workplace, including regularly cleaning high-touch surfaces;
iii.    Enhancing the ability of employees, customers and clients to wash hands or take other personal hygiene measures such as the use of hand sanitizer;
iv.    Complying with social distancing requirements established by the CDC, including maintaining six-foot social distancing for both employees and members of the general public when possible and/or employing other separation measures such as wearing face coverings or using barriers; and
 
b.     IOSHA Standards: All employers, whether manufacturers, distributors, professional offices, retailers or others, must comply with safety and health standards established and enforced by IOSHA. Employers are subject to specific standards to prevent exposure or spread of a disease. Additionally, the General Duty Clause requires employers to provide their employees with a workplace free from recognized hazards likely to cause death or serious physical harm.
Manufacturing guidelines provided by the state can be found here.
 
Contact: Jill Sims (jsims@nmma.org)
 
Iowa
Executive Orders:  Governor Kim Reynolds reopened 77 of 99 counties on May 1with some limitations. The state public health emergency and relief efforts have been extended until May 27. The reopening guidelines among the businesses that can operate in those 77 counties include:
·      Restaurants can open at 50% of their normal operating capacity. Restaurants cannot seat more than six people at a table, and all tables must be at least six feet apart. Restaurants cannot have buffets or other self-serve items.
·      Malls, fitness centers, libraries and retail stores can also open at 50% of their legal occupancy capacity, which is determined by fire code. Mall operators must keep play areas and other common seating areas, such as food courts, closed.
·      Race tracks, other than those conducting horse or dog races, can reopen as long as they do not permit spectators.
·      Social, community, recreational and leisure sporting events are limited to 10 people or fewer.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing operations are not impacted at this time.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Kansas
Executive Orders:  Governor Laura Kelly’s stay at home order expired on May 3. Her “Ad Astra: A Plan To Reopen Kansas” establishes 3 phases for reopening the economy. Under the stay at home order, a business that manufactures, distributes, sells or maintains cargo or passenger vessels or parts for such vessels were able to remain open. A modified Phase 2 will begin May 22nd. Phase 3 is expected to begin on June 8th.  Read more here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing is open under restrictions such as social distancing and increased cleanings as outlined in the “Ad Astra, A Plan to Reopen Kansas.” The previous stay at home order allowed, businesses that manufacture, distribute, sell, or maintain cargo or passenger vessels or parts for such vessels to remain open. The full list of businesses that were included in the stay at home order to remain open can be found here.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Kentucky
Executive Orders: Kentucky is currently operating under a stay at home order that lasts indefinitely during the state’s state of emergency. Gov. Beshear first imposed the order on March 25.
 
The order adopts the federal CISA guidelines for essential business and builds upon that to include broad exemptions for manufacturing.  Businesses that are currently open under the current order do not need to submit proposals to remain open.
 
The governor has also issued requirements for any visitor to the state to self-quarantine for 14days upon arrival, with several exceptions including “when required by employment.” On April 23, Gov. Beshear rolled out a “Healthy at Work” platform to engage businesses in the state to help shape the phased reopening of business. The platform invites both industry groups and individual businesses who want to submit plans.
 
Governor Beshear recently announced that manufacturers who had been designated as nonessential will be allowed to reopen and reboot operations on May 11 provided the following guidelines can be met: Continue telework where possible; Phased return to work; Onsite temperature/health checks; Universal masks and other necessary PPE; Close common areas; Enforce social distancing; Limit face-to-face meetings; Sanitizer/hand wash stations; Special accommodations; Testing plan.
 
Governor Beshear's office has released requirements for continuing business and reopening manufacturing, distribution, and supply chain businesses beginning May 11. These requirements are in addition to the 10 Healthy at Work requirements the Governor previously released. The governor also issued requirements specifically for manufacturing. Both can be found in the links below.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Governor Beshear's office has released requirements for continuing business and reopening manufacturing, distribution, and supply chain businesses beginning May 11. These requirements are in addition to the 10 Healthy at Work requirements the Governor previously released. The governor also issued requirements specifically for manufacturing.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Louisiana
Executive Orders: On May 16 Governor Jon Bel Edwards moved the state into the first phase of the Roadmap to a Resilient Louisiana, which allows additional businesses to open under strict occupancy, protection and social distancing guidelines. Phase One guidance will allow essential businesses, as defined by CISA, to remain open. Non-essential businesses (sometimes called “gray area” businesses) and places of worship may remain open at 25 percent of their occupancy.
 
More information will be forthcoming from the Resilient Louisiana Commission to Reopen the Economy.  For a list of meetings or to read more here.If you would like to submit recommendations please email: resilientlouisiana@la.gov.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Examples of critical infrastructure businesses released on April 3, including but not limited to: Food production, distribution, and sale; Construction, including, but not limited to, construction required in response to this public health emergency, hospital construction, construction of long-term care facilities, public works construction, and housing construction;  Construction Engineers; Building management and maintenance; Airport operations; Operation and maintenance of utilities, including water, sewer, and gas; Electrical, including power generation, distribution, and production of raw materials; Distribution centers; Oil and biofuel refining; Roads, highways, railroads, and public transportation; Ports; Cybersecurity operations; Flood control; Solid waste and recycling collection and removal; Internet, video, and telecommunications systems. The full list can be found here.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Maine
Executive Orders: On April 28, Governor Janet Mills extended her the stay-at-home order, which also closes non-essential businesses until May 31 and closures of non-essential businesses. Read more here.  On April 14, Governor Mills extended her civil state of emergency continues until May 15. An new online portalthrough the Maine Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) allows businesses owners, employees and other Mainers share ideas about reopening the economy.
 
Maine reopened marinas, boatyards, and boat dealerships on May 1. Businesses must pledge with the state to adhere to a COVID-19 safety checklist. They are not required to take the pledge if they were previously essential, however they are encouraged to sign on to show state agencies the boating industry is working responsibly.
 
Step 2 – Complete the state’s compliance form (option to receive a badge to show you have pledged to be compliant)
Step 3 – Educate staff, customers, and perhaps your local municipality/neighbors about the checklist
More info at Maine DECD maine.gov/decd/
 
Beginning on May 11, Maine's 12 most rural counties can now open up retail for in-store operations. This includes boat dealerships. Read more here
 
Marine Manufacturing: Essential businesses may remain open. Boat building is an essential business, the full list of essential businesses can be found here. The Maine Department of Economic and Community Development has posted additional resources to clarify essential businesses in the state, including a list of essential industries (which includes manufacturing), an essential service designation request form, a FAQ document, and this email address to ask questions: business.answers@maine.gov.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Maryland
Executive Orders: Governor Hogan’s “Maryland Strong: Roadmap to Recovery” includes a three stage plan for reopening businesses and the economy, as well as a Task Force. Recreational boating, boat races and fishing are allowed. Read more here.
 
Governor Hogan issued an executive order requiring citizens to wear face masks while out in public.  A businesses’ staff must wear face coverings.  Businesses must put in place appropriate social distancing measures r to keep their customers and their staff safe. Read morehere.
 
Marine Manufacturing: The statewide “stay at home” order was revised to an advisory on May 15., allowing all manufacturing to resume under certain guidelines. Retail establishments must keep the number of patrons to below 50% of legal capacity, however counties retain the power to keep retailers closed.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Massachusetts
Executive Orders: Governor Charlie Baker issued an emergency order on Monday March 23 requiring all businesses and organizations that do not provide essential services to close their physical workplaces. The order has been extended until May 18. Governor Baker also established a 17-member Reopening Advisory Board, read more here.
 
Governor Baker released a four-phase reopening plan which is slated to begin on March 18th.
On May 18th essential businesses, manufacturing and construction were allowed to resume. Manufacturing safety guidelines can be found here. On May 25th retail can resume through remote fulfilment and curbside pickup. Beaches and most outdoor activities, including recreational boating businesses and the charter/for-hire fishing industry, may reopen and resume with guidelines. Specific guidelines can be found below:
·      Updated recreational boating access guidance can be found here.
·      Charter and for-hire fishing guidance can be found here.
·      Reopening Standards for Recreational Boating Businesses can be found here.
 
Marine Manufacturing:  Beginning on May 18, manufacturing operations were allowed to resume operations. In order to reopen, businesses must develop a written COVID-19 Control Plan outlining how its workplace will prevent the spread of COVID-19. Manufacturing safety guidelines can be found here.
 
A set of Mandatory Workplace Safety Standards were created and are applicable to all sectors and industries that will be open in phase one, and create new workplace requirements for social distancing, hygiene, staffing and operations, and cleaning. These standards are being released to give workplaces time to plan and prepare for reopening. Read the full standard here.
For social distancing:
·       All persons, including employees, customers, and vendors should remain at least six feet apart to the greatest extent possible, both inside and outside workplaces
·       Establish protocols to ensure that employees can practice adequate social distancing
·       Provide signage for safe social distancing
·       Require face coverings or masks for all employees
For hygiene:
·       Provide hand washing capabilities throughout the workplace
·       Ensure frequent hand washing by employees and adequate supplies to do so
·       Provide regular sanitization of high touch areas, such as workstations, equipment, screens, doorknobs, restrooms throughout work site
For staffing and operations:
·       Provide training for employees regarding the social distancing and hygiene protocols
·       Employees who are displaying COVID19-like symptoms do not report to work
·       Establish a plan for employees getting ill from COVID-19 at work, and a return-to-work plan
For cleaning and disinfecting:
·       Establish and maintain cleaning protocols specific to the business
·       When an active employee is diagnosed with COVID-19, cleaning and disinfecting must be performed
·       Disinfection of all common surfaces must take place at intervals appropriate to said workplace
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Michigan
Executive Orders: Governor Gretchen Whitmer issued a “Stay Home, Stay Safe” executive order on directing all non-essential Michigan business operations to temporarily suspend in-person operations that are not necessary to sustain or protect life until 11:59PM May 28. This is an extension from the previous date of May 15. On May 7, when the order was extended to May 28, Governor Whitmer reopened manufacturing beginning May 11. Read more here
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing businesses are open as of 12:01AM on May 11. Manufacturing work may not commence until the facility at which the work will be performed has been prepared to follow the workplace safeguards described in section 11(k) of Executive Order 2020-77. See additional information below.
 
Under Executive Order 2020-77, manufacturing facilities must adopt measuresto protect their workers from the spread of COVID-19. That includes conducting a daily entry screening protocol for workers and everyone else entering the facility, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with a temperature screening as soon as no-touch thermometers can be obtained. They must also create dedicated entry points at every facility, and suspend entry of all non-essential in-person visits, including tours. Manufacturing facilities must also train workers on, among other things, how COVID-19 is transmitted from person to person, signs and symptoms of COVID-19, steps workers must take to notify the business or operation of signs and symptoms of COVID-19 or suspected or confirmed diagnosis, and the use of personal protective equipment. Read more here.
 
All businesses in Michigan —including manufacturers—must require masks to be worn when workers cannot consistently maintain six feet of separation from others, and consider face shields for those who cannot consistently maintain three feet of separation from other workers.
 
Contact: Jill Sims (jsims@nmma.org)
 
Minnesota
Executive Orders:  On May 18, Governor Tim Walz’s “Stay at Home” order expired, which allows Minnesota’s non-critical businesses to resume operation with capacity limits (salons excluded and bars/restaurants remain to-go only). Additional guidance is expected by June 1.  Read more  here.
 
On April 23, Governor Tim Walz issued an executive order that begins the process of safely returning Minnesotans to work, starting with workers in non-customer facing industrial and office-based businesses who cannot work from home. Guidance on what businesses are allowed to return to work can be found here.
 
Additionally, Governor Walz issued an Executive Order on April 17, allowing Minnesotans to engage in a range of outdoor activities and permitting some outdoor recreation centered businesses to reopen and remain open. Read more here
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing operations are open. On April 23, Gov. Walz issued an allowing  manufacturers in the state who might not have previously fallen into the “critical manufacturing” definition previously put forth by the state to reopen. Businesses that intend to reopen must implement a Preparedness Plan covering how the company will keep sick employees at home, promote telework, enforce social distancing, support hygiene and approach disinfection if necessary.
 
According to the order, senior management responsible for implementing these plans must sign and certify their company’s plan, and share it to company employees. A template plan is available here.
 
This order takes place while the state’s stay at home order remains in effect. That order exempts from enforcement “essential” manufacturing, though it imposes stricter language regarding the extent of that exemption.
 
Additional guidance provided on April 13 indicates the following components of marine businesses as essential:
·      Workers necessary for the operation of safe harbors and marinas to provide refuge for boaters when conditions making boating on open water unsafe and operations related to safety services such as fuel, emergency dockage and sanitary pump-out stations.
·      Workers providing boat transportation services.
·      Workers who install and support the installation of docks, boat lifts and other water related equipment and boat delivery.
Contact: Jill Sims (jsims@nmma.org)
 
Mississippi
Executive Orders: Governor Tate Reeves extended his a “safer at home” order, effective until May 25, lifting some restrictions in the state, allowing for businesses to continue operating as “essential” under the purposes of the order. The “safer at home” order encourages those in Mississippi to stay home, and requires the cancellation of mass gatherings of more than 10 people. Businesses that continue operating should practice social distancing, close common spaces “to the extent possible,” and practice sanitization. Non-essential retail businesses are permitted to operate at 50% capacity. Read more here.
 
Governor Tate has created the Governor’s Commission for Economic Recovery called Restart Mississippi. The Commission is open to comments, read more here or use the email address: info@restartms.ms
 
Marine Manufacturing: The executive order adopts the definition of exempt official business as defined in executive order 1463, which made exemptions made for “essential” businesses as defined by the federal CISA guidance as well as added language designating manufacturing as essential:
Manufacturing including food processing and production, pharmaceuticals, food additives, medical equipment, medical devices and supplies, technology, biotechnology, chemical products, telecommunications products, automotive production and suppliers, healthcare, energy, steel and steel products, fuel and petroleum exploration and production, lubricants, greases and engine oils, mining, national defense, sanitary and cleaning products, household products, personal care products, products used by any other Essential Business or Operation.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Missouri
Executive Orders:  On April 27, Missouri issued a public health order allowing for a partial reopening of businesses beginning on May 4 as part of Governor Parsons’s “Show Me Strong Recovery” plan. The order will stay in effect through May 31 and allow for the reopening of non-essential businesses including retail and dine-in restaurants as long as they enforce social distancing and limit capacity to a proportion of square footage as outlined within the order.
 
A companion FAQ document says the new order will apply to all Missouri businesses but has
the intention of restarting operations for non-essential companies that have been closed during the stay-at-home order.
 
St. Louis has opened more businesses.  Under the plan that beings May 15, all Kansas City businesses will be able to open but are subject to a"10/10/10 Rule."The city said based on public health guidance, nonessential businesses that are not open to the public will be permitted to open May 6 and will be subject to social distancing guidance. Kansas City Interim City Manager Earnest Rouse announced asoft reopening of some city of Kansas City facilities, including City Hall, starting May 18.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Governor Parsons implemented Phase 1 of his re-opening plan, which allows the reopening ofall businesses provided that the social distancing guidelines set forth in the new health order are followed. Some businesses will be required to take additional precautions to protect their employees and the public, such as occupancy limits at retail locations.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Montana
Executive Orders: Previously, Governor Steve Bullock issued a health directive which expired on April 27. The order allows for reopening of businesses in phases. The order permits bars and restaurants to begin operating again under strict social distancing standards beginning May 4. Read more here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing is open as the directive expired April 27. All businesses should follow reopening phases found here or in the directive here.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Nebraska
Executive Orders: Currently there are no business related executive orders impacting manufacturing, but for a full list of Governor Pete Ricketts’ COVID related actions read here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Business operations are not impacted at this time.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Nevada
Executive Orders:  Nevada is currently operating under Phase One of the Nevada United: Roadmap to Recovery Plan through May 30, allowing stores to reopen if they limit patrons to no more than 50 percent of their legal occupational capacity, including non-essential businesses such as restaurants and retail businesses reopening under this phase.
 
Gov. Sisolak first imposed a stay at home order on March 31, allowing for individuals to leave their place of residence to work at “essential licensed businesses” as established by a previous emergency order.
 
Nevada must also require businesses to enforce face coverings for employees who interact with the public, social distancing guidelines and foot traffic limitations, leaving it to NV OSHA to
ensure that businesses practice these standards.
 
Marine Manufacturing: In the document provided in the March 20 order, Section 1(b) includes exemptions for “essential infrastructure operations, including … manufacturing.” Companies that remain in operation must practice social distancing and other mitigation policies.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
New Hampshire
Executive Orders: Governor Sununu’s modified Stay-At-Home order will be in effect until May 31. The order allows for applicable industries to begin reopening in phases in accordance with guidance from the Department of Health. This order includes updated guidance for manufacturing businesses to follow while continuing their operations.
 
Governor Sununu formed the Governor’s Economic Re-Opening Task Force, which will develop and oversee the state and private-sector actions needed to reopen New Hampshire. The task force has put forth a blue print which can be found here. Read more about the task force here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Modifications to the state orders regulating manufacturing were amended specifically to allow manufacturing under safety guidelines. Read more here.  
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
New Jersey
Executive Orders: Governor Phil Murphy issued an executive order effective 9:00PM Sunday March 22 enacting a stay at home order and closing all nonessential businesses. “To the extent a business or non-profit has employees that cannot perform their functions via telework or work-from-home arrangements, the business or non-profit should make best efforts to reduce staff on site to the minimal number necessary to ensure that essential operations can continue.” Read more here. The Governor issued additional guidance for manufacturers on April 8, read more here.
 
On April 18th, Governor Murphy, along with Governor Cuomo (NY) and Lamont (CT) announced that marinas, boatyards and marine manufacturers in their states will be allowed to open for personal use as long as strict social distancing and sanitization protocols are followed.
 
On April 27th, Governor Murphy announced his vision, “The Road Back: Restoring Economic Health Through Public Health”, to restart New Jersey and put the state on the road to recovery. Governor Murphy outlined six key principles and benchmarks to guide the process for restoring New Jersey’s economic health by ensuring public health. Read more here.
 
Beginning May 20, Governor Murphy has added boat dealerships to the list of essential businesses that may open however they must operate under the following provisions:
a. Limit occupancy at 50% of the stated maximum store capacity and require all customer visits, including sales, to be by appointment only;
b. Establish hours of operation, wherever possible, that permit access solely to high-risk individuals, as defined by the CDC;
c. Install a physical barrier, such as a shield guard, between customers and salespersons wherever feasible or otherwise ensure six feet of distance between those individuals, except at the moment of payment and/or exchange of goods;
d. Require infection control practices, such as regular hand washing, coughing and sneezing etiquette, and proper tissue usage and disposal;
e. Provide employees break time for repeated handwashing throughout the workday;
f. Arrange for contactless pay options, pickup, and/or delivery of goods wherever feasible. Such policies shall, wherever possible, consider populations that do not have access to internet service;
g. Provide sanitization materials, such as hand sanitizer and sanitizing wipes, to staff and customers;
h. Require frequent sanitization of high-touch areas like restrooms, credit card machines, keypads, counters and shopping carts;
i. Place conspicuous signage at entrances and throughout the store, if applicable, alerting staff and customers to the required six feet of physical distance;
j. Demarcate six feet of spacing in check-out and service lines to demonstrate appropriate spacing for social distancing; and
k. Require workers and customers to wear cloth face coverings while on the premises, except where doing so would inhibit that individual's health or where the individual is under two years of age, and require workers to wear gloves when in contact with customers or goods. Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings and gloves for their employees. If a customer refuses to wear a cloth face covering for non-medical reasons and if such covering cannot be provided to the individual by the business at the point of entry, then the business must decline entry to the individual. Nothing in the stated policy should prevent workers or customers from wearing a surgical-grade mask or other more protective face covering if the individual is already in possession of such equipment, or if the business is otherwise required to provide such worker with more protective equipment due to the nature of the work involved. Where an individual declines to wear a face covering on store premises due to a medical condition that inhibits such usage, neither the essential retail business nor its staff shall require the individual to produce medical documentation verifying the stated condition. 
 
Test Drives: The businesses may permit customers to test drive vehicles, including cars and motorcycles, boats, or bicycles sold or leased by the business provided that the business permits the individual to access the vehicle alone, or in the case of boats, with an employee of the business but only when social distancing can be maintained, and provided that the business must appropriately clean and sanitize the vehicle, boat, or bicycle after such test drive if the customer does not purchase the item. Read the full provision here.
 
Non-essential retail businesses may allow curbside pickup of goods, beginning May 18, but businesses must continue to have their in-store operations closed to customers. Businesses who choose to offer curbside pickup must abide by the requirements in Governor Murphy’s Order, which include but are not limited to the following:
·       In-store operations should be limited to those employees who are responsible for the operations required for curbside pickup;
·       Customer transactions should be handled in advance by phone, email, facsimile or other means that avoid person-to-person contact;
·       Customers shall notify the retailer by text message, email, or phone once they arrive, or make best efforts to schedule their arrival time in advance. The customer should be asked to remain in their vehicle, if arriving by car, until store staff delivers the purchase;
·       Designated employees should bring goods outside of the retail establishment and place goods directly in a customer's vehicle when possible, avoiding person-to-person contact; and
·       Such businesses must follow social distancing and mitigation practices outlined in previous orders, including requiring workers to wear cloth face coverings when in contact with other workers or customers and gloves when in contact with goods or customers.
Marine Manufacturing: Marine Manufacturers are allowed to open as long as strict social distancing and sanitization protocols are followed. In accordance with Executive Order-122, the full order can be read here:
Manufacturing businesses, warehousing businesses, and businesses engaged in essential construction projects must adopt policies that include, at minimum, the following requirements:
a. Prohibit non-essential visitors from entering the worksite;
b. Limit worksite meetings, inductions, and workgroups to groups of fewer than ten individuals;
c. Require individuals to maintain six feet or more distance between them wherever possible;
d. Stagger work start and stop times where practicable to limit the number of individuals entering and leaving the worksite concurrently;
e. Stagger lunch breaks and work times where practicable to enable operations to safely
continue while utilizing the least number of individuals possible at the site;
f. Restrict the number of individuals who can access common areas, such as restrooms and breakrooms, concurrently;
g. Require workers and visitors to wear cloth face coverings, in accordance with CDC recommendations, while on the premises, except where doing so would inhibit the individual’s health or the individual is under two years of age, and require workers to wear gloves while on the premises. Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings and gloves for their employees. If a visitor refuses to wear a cloth face covering for non-medical reasons and if such covering cannot be provided to the individual by the business at the point of entry, then the business must decline entry to the individual. Nothing in the stated policy should prevent workers or visitors from wearing a surgical-grade mask or other more protective face covering if the individual is already in possession of such equipment, or if the businesses is otherwise required to provide such worker with more protective equipment due to the nature of the work involved. Where an individual declines to wear a face covering on the premises due to a medical condition that inhibits such usage, neither the business nor its staff shall require the individual to produce medical documentation verifying the stated condition;
h. Require infection control practices, such as regular hand washing, coughing and sneezing etiquette, and proper tissue usage and disposal;
i. Limit sharing of tools, equipment, and machinery;
j. Provide sanitization materials, such as hand sanitizer and sanitizing wipes, to workers and visitors; and
k. Require frequent sanitization of high-touch areas like restrooms, breakrooms, equipment, and machinery.
 
The Governor’s original executive order (107) does not mention manufacturing and focuses mostly on restrictions for retail businesses. Section 10 says that businesses remaining open must accommodate employee “telework” wherever possible, while Section 11 orders businesses to practice social distancing and reduced workforce arrangements wherever possible for employees who cannot telework.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
New Mexico
Executive Orders: Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham issued an extended public health emergency order that encourages residents to stay home except for essential trips through May 31. However, unlike previous orders, this order allows non-essential business operations to resume at the reduced capacity of 25%. Read more here.
 
Marine Manufacturing:  Manufacturing operations are open. Under the latest directive, Non-essential businesses (other than retailers; such as office spaces, call centers) generally may operate according to CSPs at up to 25 percent of pre-crisis staffing levels. All employees should continue to work from home wherever possible.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
New York
Executive Orders: Governor Andrew Cuomo's business mentor program is available to assist in-state businesses.. Governor Andrew Cuomo extended Executive Order 202.6 through May 15 which requires businesses and not-for-profit entities to reduce in-person workforce at any work locations by 100% exempt for essential businesses. Read more here.
 
On April 18th, Governor Cuomo, along with Governor Lamont (CT) and Murphy (NJ) announced that marinas, boatyards and marine manufacturers in their states will be allowed to open for personal use as long as strict social distancing and sanitization protocols are followed.
 
Governor Cuomo indicated that the economy will reopen in phases in New York. Phase one will include opening construction and manufacturing functions with low risk. Read more here.
 
The following regions met the seven metrics required to begin reopening and reopened on May 15. North Country (Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton, Jefferson, Lewis, St. Lawrence counties), Finger Lakes (Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Orleans, Seneca, Wayne, Wyoming, Yates counties), Southern Tier (Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Delaware, Schuyler, Steuben, Tioga, Tompkins counties), and Mohawk Valley (Fulton, Herkimer, Montgomery, Oneida, Otsego, Schoharie counties). These regions include the following counties:  There are five types of nonessential businesses that can reopen in the eligible regions beginning Friday, which the state is calling "Phase 1":
·      Construction
·      Manufacturing
·      Wholesale trade
·      Retail (for curbside pickup only)
·      Agriculture, forestry and fishing
Some portions of those industries were already declared essential and have remained open.
 
Marine Manufacturing:The guidance on essential businesses now includes a section on Recreation and includes the following:
 
Marinas, boatyards, and recreational marine manufacturers, for ongoing marina operations and boat repair/maintenance, where such facilities adhere to strict social distancing and sanitization protocols. Use of such sites for the purposes of personal use or operation of boats or other watercraft is permissible, provided that no establishment offer chartered watercraft services or rentals. Restaurant activity at such sites are limited to take-out or delivery only.
 
Marine Manufacturers are allowed to open as long as they follow strict social distancing and sanitization protocols.
 
On April 12, Governor Cuomo signed an executive order requiring employers to provide masks to essential employees who interact with the public. The order requires “any employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public.” Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings for their employees.
 
On April 15, Governor Cuomo signed an executive order requiring individuals to wear a face mask when in a public place and unable to maintain, or not maintaining, social distance effective Friday April 17. Read more here.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
North Carolina
Executive Orders: North Carolina’s stay at home order expired May 8. Read more here.
On May 5, Governor Cooper announced Phase 1; easing restrictions on travel, business operations, and mass gatherings.
 
Marine Manufacturers:  Phase 1 removes the distinction between essential and nonessential businesses and allows individuals to leave their homes for any commercial activity
at a business that is open.
Contact: Lee Gatts (lgatts@nmma.org)
 
North Dakota
Executive Orders: Currently there are no business related executive orders impacting manufacturing, but for a full list of Governor Doug Burgum’s COVID related actions read here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing operations are not impacted at this time.  
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Ohio
Executive Orders:  Governor Mike DeWine announced the Ohio Department of Health has issued a stay-at-home order effective Monday March 23 at 11:59PM in through 11:59PM May 29, which is an extension from the previous date of April 30.  The manufacturing industry is able to open on Monday May 4. Marinas and boat repair businesses are included under essential infrastructure. Read more here.
 
Governor DeWine introduced “Responsible RestartOhio”, which is geared towards helping implement policies to reopen certain sectors. On May 4, manufacturing, distribution, and construction sectors of the economy will open but are required to follow strict guidelines on how to reopen. The manufacturing, distribution & construction guidelines can be found here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing is allowed under “Responsible RestartOhio”, which went into effect Monday May 4.
 
Section 20 provides general COVID-19 information and checklist for businesses and employers. Section 21 outlines sector specific actions to be taken by manufacturers.
 
21. Sector Specific COVID-19 Information and Checklist for Business/Employers. Businesses and employers, whether currently open or reopening, are to take the following measures:
 
a. Manufacturing, distribution & construction:
i.      Ensure minimum 6 feet between people, if not possible, install barriers
ii.     Employees must perform daily symptom assessment that should include taking temperature with a thermometer or monitoring for fever. Also watching for coughing or trouble breathing;
iii.    Require employees to stay home if symptomatic;
iv.    Consider having distributers and guests wear face coverings at all times;
v.     Require regular handwashing;
vi.    Stagger or limit arrivals of employees and guests;
vii. Have employees work from home wherever possible;
viii.Daily disinfection of desks and workstations;
ix.    Change shift patterns (e.g. fewer shifts);
x.     Stagger lunch and break times;
xi.    Daily deep disinfection of high-contact surfaces;
xii. Space factory floor to allow for distancing;
xiii.Regulate max number of people in cafeterias/common spaces;
xiv.Establish maximum capacity;
xv. Immediately isolate and seek medical care for any individual who develops symptoms while at work;
xvi.Contact the local health district about suspected cases or exposures; and
xvii. Shutdown shop/floor for deep sanitation if possible.
 
Contact: Jill Sims (jsims@nmma.org)
 
Oklahoma
Executive Orders: Governor Kevin Stitt issued a stay at home order, closing all non-essential businesses, has been extended until June 1. Businesses should refer to CISA guidance to determine if essential if not listed. On April 22, Governor Stitt released an “Open Up and Recover Safely” plan that calls for reopening some most retail businesses by May 15. Employers in Oklahoma are asked to keep common areas closed, practice social distancing and minimize non-essential travel. Read more about the plan and the timeline here. Governor Stitt also ordered the legislature to reconvene on Tuesday May 5 to concur with his declaration of a health emergency.
 
Marine Manufacturing:  The latest order (in Section 20) adopts the federal CISA guidance as Oklahoma’s definition of essential businesses, and adds to it a number of additional manufacturing sectors as defined by this amended memorandum. Additional guidance was released including defining critical manufacturing to include: paper manufacturing, printing and related support activities, plastics and rubber products manufacturing, mineral product manufacturing, primary metal manufacturing including equipment.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Oregon
Executive Orders: Governor Kate Brown ordered a stay at home order to the maximum extent possible, some businesses are permitted to operate if they are able to meet social distancing policies as established by the Oregon Health Authority. The order will remain in effect until rescinded. It can be found here. Governor Brown has extended the state of emergency until July 6, read more here. Governor Brown has released an initial phased reopening plan, read more here.
 
As of May 22, all counties have been approved for phase 1 EXCEPT: Clackamas, Marion, Multnomah, Polk and Washington.
 
Starting May 15th, new guidelines will take effect for all counties not entering Phase 1 Reopening. The following will be open:
  • Stand alone retail operations are open provided they meet required safety and physical distancing guidelines. Indoor and outdoor malls are closed. For full retail guidelines, click here.
  • Local outdoor recreation activities are open, including many state parks.
  • Local social gatherings over 10 people are prohibited and those under 10 people must use physical distancing.
Marine Manufacturing: The restrictions appear only to affect retail businesses and do not affect manufacturing or other industrial operations, except to require businesses to practice maximum possible amounts of telework, and to “designate an employee or officer to establish, implement, and enforce social distancing policies.”
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Pennsylvania
Executive Orders: On April 20, Governor Tom Wolf released his phased reopening plan and extended both his stay at home order for individuals (not businesses) and face mask requirements. All essential state services will continue. The reopen plan has three phases, red, yellow and green. Read more here.  The state released a document providing businesses with a list of resources regarding Covid-19.
 
On Friday, May 8, 24 of the 67 counties moved from red to yellow. The phases are defined here. These counties include: Bradford, Cameron, Centre, Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, Crawford, Elk, Erie, Forest, Jefferson, Lawrence, Lycoming, McKean, Mercer, Montour, Northumberland, Potter, Snyder, Sullivan, Tioga, Union, Venango, and Warren. All other counties are still in the red phase.
 
On April 8, Governor Wolf signed an executive order authorizing state agencies to “commandeer and utilize all PPE, pharmaceuticals, and other medical resources required” within the state to respond to COVID-19, seizing these items “from all private, public, and quasi-public health care providers and facilities, as well as manufacturers and suppliers of PPE, pharmaceuticals, and other medical resources located within the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.”  Finally, the order pledges to compensate those entities from whom the state commandeers PPE, pharmaceuticals and other medical resources “under terms and conditions agreed upon.” Read more here.
 
On April 15 the Pennsylvania Department of Health began to requirebusinesses that are operating  to provide masks for employees to wear during the normal course of daily operations. Read more here.
 
Section A(10) of the order says businesses that have been approved to continue operations must:
 Provide masks for employees to wear during their time at the business, and make it a mandatory requirement to wear masks while on the work site, except to the extent an employee is using break time to eat or drink, in accordance with the guidance from the Department of Health and the CDC. Employers may approve masks obtained or made by employees in accordance with Department of Health guidance.
 
 The order also imposes additional operational requirements of businesses in Pennsylvania, including staggering work and break start and stop times, limiting access to common areas and enforcing social distancing within break spaces, conducting meetings virtually, providing employees with access to regular handwashing, and prohibiting visits by non-essential persons.
The order (in Section A(3)) also offers detailed requirements of businesses that have been exposed to a person with a probable or confirmed case of COVID-19. Requirements include:
Closing off and ventilating areas visited by an infected person for 24 hours before disinfecting those areas; Identifying employees who were in close contact with a possibly infected person, notify them of such, monitor them for symptoms and dispatch them from work if they become sick, and implement CDC Guidance for employees who interacted with an infected person; Implement temperature screenings before work or work shifts, and send home employees with a temperature above 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit. Read more on the order here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Ship and boat manufacturers are not essential businesses, however engine, turbine and power transmission equipment manufacturers are considered essential. A full list of essential businesses can be found here.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Rhode Island
Executive Orders: Governor Gina Raimondo’s “Stay at Home” order was lifted on May 8 and Rhode Island has moved into Phase 1 of “Reopen Rhode Island.” In Phase 1, social gathers will be expanded to a limit of 5 individuals and non-critical retail can reopen with capacity limits. Read more here
 
Marinas are included as critical. Read more here. Guidance for marina operations can be foundhere.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Manufacturing operations are not impacted at this time.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
South Carolina
Executive Orders: On April 20, Governor McMaster issued an order permitting certain “non-essential” retail establishments to begin reopening. The Governor’s previous stay-at-home order had adopted federal CISA guidance for essential businesses, allowing manufacturing to continue operating under the order. South Carolina also previously imposed a mandatory, 14-day self-quarantine for some out-of state visitors, which has since been rescinded.
 
Governor McMaster’s previous order required a list of “nonessential” businesses like entertainment venues, recreational and athletic facilities, and close contact service providers to close, while also for the first time defining the list of “essential” activities for which individuals could leave their homes. The order, in Section F(1), defines “essential” businesses as those identified by the federal CISA guidelines. The order will stay in effect through the duration of the state of emergency for South Carolina is in effect, and empowers the South Carolina Department of Commerce to issue additional clarifications. On April 27, Gov. McMaster extended the state of emergency for another 15 days. Read more here.
 
Marine Manufacturers: The order, in Section F(1), defines “essential” businesses as those identified by the federal CISA guidelines. The order will stay in effect through the duration of the state of emergency for South Carolina is in effect, and empowers the South Carolina Department of Commerce to issue additional clarifications.
 
The order specifies that the South Carolina Department of Commerce is empowered to additional clarifying regulations and answer questions at the following contact information: covid19sc@sccommerce.com or at 803-734-2873. The order will last for as long as a state of emergency is in effect for South Carolina.
 
Contact: Lee Gatts (lgatts@nmma.org)
 
South Dakota
Executive Orders: Governor Kristi Noem released her “Back to Normal” plan  and also issued an executive order encouraging businesses to allow their employees to telework until May 31, 2020. Read more here. In an additional executive order, the Governor requires vulnerable individuals (defined by the order to include adults over the age of 65 and those with underlying medical conditions) in Minnehaha and Lincoln Counties (covering the Sioux Falls are) to stay at home. However, individuals within those categories who are employed in "essential" businesses as defined by the federal CISA guidance are exempt from the order.
 
Marine Manufacturing: A section reading “Limitations” asks South Dakotans to read the order in conjunction with the federal CISA guidance, suggesting continued exemptions for manufacturers in the state.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Tennessee
Executive Orders: Governor Bill Lee Governor Bill Lee announced on April 28 a new Safer At Home order for residents of Tennessee. The order is in effect from 12:01PM April 29, 2020 until 11:59PM May 29. The new order relaxes previous restrictions put in place. Read more about the order here. 
The new order indicates certain businesses, organizations or venues that offer close-contact personal services must remain closed; such as barbershops, hair salons, nail salons, etc. However, the new order provides further information for individuals and employers to return safely to work. Under the order, individuals are encouraged permitted to return to work while following health guidelines. The order does note that six local counties (Davidson, Hamilton, Knox, Madison, Shelby and Sullivan) have local authority to issue additional orders.
On April 24, Governor Lee rolled out the first steps from the Tennessee Pledge the state’s rollout of guidance and best practices for Tennessee businesses in 89 of the state’s 95 counties to keep employees and customers safe during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. You can find general guidelines for all business here.
 
Marine Manufacturers: Manufacturers are open but required to comply with health guidelines set forth. Manufacturers in Davidson, Hamilton, Knox, Madison, Shelby and Sullivan counties should check for any additional orders that may impact business operations.
 
Contact: Lee Gatts (lgatts@nmma.org)
 
Texas
Executive Orders: Governor Abbott issued Executive Order GA-23 establishes criteria for retail and dining businesses to reopen. The order expires June 3. “Reopening Texas” provides further guidance. The governor also prohibited law enforcement from jailing persons who violate Covid-related restrictions. There are no restrictions affecting out-of-state visitors.
 
Marine Manufacturers: Gov. Abbott’s current order expands “Reopening Texas”  to specifically permit manufacturers who have otherwise been closed to reopen on May 18 at up to 25% occupancy of the facility.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Utah
Executive Orders: While Utah never imposed a stay at home order, the state is  operating under a “moderate risk” posture that allows for some reopening of business in the state. Read more here.
 
The current posture allows for limited in-person retail and dine-in service at restaurants, among other changes. Click here to read state guidelines on phased reopening. Utah had previously operated under a “high risk” posture that imposed more limitations on those businesses and other industries, with general exceptions for essential businesses including manufacturing. Utah had previously recommended residents stay at home, and imposed requirements that out of state travelers register upon arrival in the state (which is now expired).
 
Marine Manufacturers: The order encourages all employers to follow social distancing, to read the full order and social distancing directives. Read more here.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Vermont
Executive Orders: Governor Phil Scott revised Executive Order 01-20 to allow the Secretary of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development (ACCD) to issue mitigation requirements and procedures for the limited, incremental and phased resumption of business, non-profit and government entity operations which had previously been determined to be non-critical services under Stay Home/Stay Safe. The limited, incremental, and phased resumption of business, non-profit and government entity operations shall begin May 18 with non-essential retail; and mitigation requirements and procedures issued by the Secretary shall require implementation of appropriate occupancy limits and physical distancing, health and sanitation and training measures. Read more here.
In early May Governor Scott announced additional steps to move Vermonters forward in re-opening the economy. Manufacturing, outdoor work and construction have been able to resume under limitations and health requirements. Read more here
 
Marine Manufacturers:  Manufacturing is able to resume under limitations and with strict health and safety requirements. Effective May 4, manufacturing and distribution operations may resume with a maximum of 10 employees in any location if they are low-density and ensure employees are always six feet apart.
 
Effective May 11, manufacturing, construction and distribution operations may restart with as few employees as necessary to permit full operations if they can meet all health and safety requirements, comply with ACCD guidance and develop enhanced training programs that expand on the Vermont Occupational Safety and Health Agency (VOSHA) training.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Virginia
Executive Orders: Governor Ralph Northam issued a stay at home executive order effective until June 10, ordering residents to stay home and keeping non-essential businesses closed in Virginia. A full list of essential businesses can be found here, if a business is not listed in paragraph 5 and offers professional services, non-retail, they may continue to operate but encourages telework and/or social distancing. Read more here.
 
Governor Northam released a “Forward Virginia” blueprintas well as created a Business Task Force. Read more here. Phase one of the blueprint will go into effect on May 15 for all counties except: Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun and Prince William counties; the cities of Alexandria, Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas and Manassas Park; and the towns of Dumfries, Herndon, Leesburg and Vienna. Phase one allows brick and mortar retail to reopen at 50% capacity while following social distancing. Read the full requirements here.
 
Northern Virginia counties and towns including Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun and Prince William counties; the cities of Alexandria, Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas and Manassas Park; and the towns of Dumfries, Herndon, Leesburg and Vienna, will not enter phase one until at least May 28 according to executive order 62 and public health order 4. Read more here.
 
Marine Manufacturing: All businesses shall, to the extent possible, adhere to social distancing recommendations, enhanced sanitizing practices on common surfaces, and other appropriate workplace guidance from state and federal authorities while in operation. Although business operations offering professional rather than retail services may remain open, they should utilize teleworking as much as possible. Where telework is not feasible, such business must adhere to social distancing recommendations, enhanced sanitizing practices on common surfaces, and apply the relevant workplace guidance from state and federal authorities.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
Washington
Executive Orders: Governor Jay Inslee announced that marine dealerships can resume sales on May 15. Nevertheless, he has extended his “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order effective until May 31, requiring all residents to stay home unless they are part of the list of “Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers.” In Section 1(b) the order incorporates by reference the federal CISA guidance as the designation of essential manufacturing businesses. See the “Federal” section above for more detail there. Washington issued a critical infrastructure clarification document alongside the order, which mirrors the CISA guidance. The full list of Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers can be found here. Governor Inslee’s Safe Start phased in plan can be read here.
 
As of May 18, ten counties, including Asotin, Columbia, Ferry, Garfield, Lincoln, Pend Oreille, Skamania, Stevens, Wahkiahum, and Whitman, have received guidance to move into phase 2, which allows in-store retail operations may resume with limitations. Retailers must follow the guidance found here.
 
Businesses seeking clarification as to whether their business qualifies as essential under this guidance can email business@mil.wa.gov. There is also a form which businesses can fill out here to “register” as essential.
 
Marine Manufacturing: Gov. Inslee’s office has indicated Phase II, which would allow the resumption of manufacturing, may be adopted at the end of May. For now, Washington’s critical infrastructure clarification mirrors the CISA guidance. The full list of Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers can be found here.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)
 
West Virginia
Executive Orders: On March 23, Governor Jim Justice imposed a stay-at-home order temporarily shutting down all non-essential business, exempting “essential” businesses as defined by the federal CISA guidance, with added exemptions for the “manufacture, distribution, and supply chain for critical products or industries.” Read more here.
 
On April 27, Gov. Justice issued West Virginia’s plan for partial reopening, including stages for relaxed restrictions on different business types and sizes. Read more here.
 
The Week 1 phase of reopening’s began on Thursday, April 30. From there, each phase of the reopening process for Weeks 2-6 will begin on Monday of each subsequent week. Case numbers will continue to be monitored throughout the entire reopening process.
 
Click HERE to view "West Virginia Strong - Comeback Plan"
 
Marine Manufacturing: In regards to specific language for exemption for manufacturing it states: “Manufacture, distribution, and supply chain for critical products and industries: manufacturing companies, distributors, and supply chain companies producing and supplying essential products and services and for industries such as pharmaceutical, technology, bio technology, healthcare chemicals and sanitation, waste pick up in disposal, agriculture, food and beverage, transportation, energy Iron ore, steel and steel products, aluminum and aluminum products, petroleum propane and fuel, mining, construction, national defense, communications, as well as products used by other essential businesses is an operations including without limitation filters in filtration products and services.” For more information, click here.
 
Contact: David Dickerson (ddickerson@nmma.org)
 
Wisconsin
Executive Orders: On May 13, the Wisconsin Supreme Court struck down the stay at home order through May 26 that was issued by Governor Tony Evers. The Supreme Court decision can be read here.
 
On May 18, Governor Evers indicated he would push furthur state restricionts and would leave it up to local health officials. Previously, Governor Tony Evers had issued a stay at thome order that closed all non-essential businesses, with exemptions for manufacturers.
 
 
Marine Manufacturing:  Manufacturing operations may be subject to local health orders, as the statewide order has been overruled by the Supreme Court.
 
Under the prevoius order - Section 13(a) defines as essential those manufacturers include in the federal CISA guidance. Section 13(v) also offers this additional exemption for manufacturers:
 
Manufacture, distribution, and supply chain for critical products and industries. Manufacturing companies, distributors, and supply chain companies producing and supplying essential products and services in and for industries such as pharmaceutical, technology, biotechnology, healthcare, chemicals and sanitation, waste pickup and disposal, agriculture, food and beverage, transportation, energy, steel and steel products, petroleum and fuel, mining, construction, national defense, communications, and products used by other Essential Governmental Functions and Essential Businesses and Operations.
 
 
Contact: Jill Sims (jsims@nmma.org)
 
Wyoming
Executive Orders:  Public health orders related to COVID-19 issued by Governor Mark Gordon expired on April 30. Governor Gordon’s plan to reopen the Wyoming economy can be read here.
 
Marine Manufacturing:  Manufacturing operations are not impacted at this time.
 
Contact: Libby Yranski (lyranski@nmma.org)